Working whilst you study

You will probably find that as a student you will need to take a part time job to make you more financially independent from your parents or carers.

You may choose to work in the day (when you are not in college or university), in the evening or at the weekend.

Experience

Employers look at any employment as an asset and most companies look to employ people with previous communication, motivational, problem solving, planning, organisational and IT skills.

So as well as earning you some much needed money, part-time work will also help you with your future employment.

Considerations if you are a disabled student

Be realistic about what you can and can’t do if you are a disabled student but don’t be put off a job because the workplace is not accessible to you.

All employers have a responsibility to make sure that they offer a workplace that is as accessible as possible for disabled people.

Also, your employer might never have had a disabled employee before and the barriers to thriving in the workplace are different for every disabled person. It’s usually a matter of gradual education, both for the employer and for you.

Don’t expect everything to be perfect from day one.

Finding work

There are lots of ways to find part-time work:-

  • Go to your local Connexions Centre or your school or college careers service and look at the opportunities.
  • Speak to your tutors and find out if your college or university has a job shop or schemes for work experience.
  • Be proactive and speak to employers and ask if there are any vacancies.
  • Target the sectors that you are interested in working in – write to them including your CV. If you look in the Yellow Pages, this will help you with addresses.
  • Volunteer in a company to get experience and then make yourself useful and be on the spot if any vacancies come up.
  • Try to catch opportunities before they go public – speak to people already working there, as companies sometimes advertise internally first.
  • Speak to friends and relatives and ask them to keep their eyes open for vacancies where they work.

Don’t take too much on

Whatever you decide to do, look after yourself and be careful about how much you take on.

The extra money is great but you also need to ensure you have enough time and energy for your studies and have a social life too.

Who can help?

Check out your local Connexions Centre or your school, college or university’s careers service and look at the opportunities on offer.

Be proactive and speak to employers and ask if there are any vacancies.

You can search for jobs and find careers articles at www.connexions-direct.com/jobs4u/, the Connexions Direct careers database.

Target the sectors that you are interested in working in – write to them including your CV. If you look in the Yellow Pages, this will help you with addresses. You can also visit their website at http://www.yell.com

You can find out more about the laws surrounding Child Employment on the teachernet website.